cookie - Gluten Free Pizzelle Recipe

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cookie - Gluten Free Pizzelle Recipe

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  • Prep Time

    minutes

  • Total Time

    minutes

  • Servings

    servings


Ingredients

  • 2

    large eggs

  • ½

    cup sugar (or evaporated cane juice for refined sugar-free)

  • 6

    Tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled

  • 2

    teaspoons pure vanilla extract

  • 1

    teaspoon anise, lemon, almond or more vanilla extract

  • ½

    cup + 2 Tablespoons white rice flour (or brown rice flour)

  • ½

    cup Bob's Red Mill non-GMO cornstarch (or potato starch for corn-free)

  • 1⅓

    teaspoons gluten-free aluminum-free baking powder (Rumford or Featherweight is corn-free)

  • ¼

    teaspoon xanthan gum (or guar gum)

  • Pinch of fine sea salt

Directions

In a medium-size bowl, whisk the rice flour, cornstarch, baking powder and salt together; and set it aside. In a larger, bowl, whisk the eggs, sugar, butter, vanilla, and anise together in a large bowl. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients a little at a time and stir until fully incorporated. The batter should be thick and sticky (thicker than pancake batter, but much softer than cookie dough). Set the batter aside for 10 minutes. Preheat your pizelle maker according to the manufacturer's instructions. Close the lid slowly and press down firmly or lock the press. Bake the pizzelles until they are lightly golden brown, about 30 seconds. Remove them from the press by lifting them up using a heat-resistant rubber spatula and transfer them to a flat surface to cool. (They will be very soft but will harden quickly.) As an option, you can mold them into cups or cones to fill with whipped cream, ice cream, etc. Just do not allow them go cool until you have shaped them. In addition, prior to cooling, you may use kitchen scissors to trim off any excess so they are perfectly shaped. Variation: Add 3 tablespoons unsweetened gluten free cocoa powder plus 3 tablespoons sugar to make gluten free chocolate pizzelles. Because rice flour absorbs moisture, allowing the dough to rest for long periods will thicken it. I suppose if you needed it well at room temperature it would soften up. If you try it and it is too thick, you can add more butter and whip it up in your mixer using the dough hook or paddle attachment.


Nutrition

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