Perfectly Seasoned Steak

Photo by karen l.
Adapted from offthemeathook.com

PREP TIME

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minutes

TOTAL TIME

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minutes

SERVINGS

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servings

PREP TIME

--

minutes

TOTAL TIME

--

minutes

SERVINGS

--

servings

Adapted from offthemeathook.com

Ingredients

  • 1

    . Buy a good quality steak. I like a steak that has fat in it and around it, because it helps to keep it juicy and tender during cooking. My favorite cut to use is a ribeye, with or without a bone.

Directions

. About an hour before cooking, take the steaks out of the fridge and put them on a plate or on top of their butcher paper. Sprinkle them heavily with a coarse sea salt or kosher salt on both sides. Two things are important here: the first is to use a lot of salt (as in the photo) and the second is to use a salt that has big grains, not a fine-grained table salt. I learned this tip from Jaden at Steamy Kitchen, who uses it to turn cheaper steaks into something better. I prefer to start with a great steak and then apply this technique, for maximum deliciousness! How To Cook Steaks On Your Stovetop That Taste Better Than in a Fancy Restaurant 3. When you’re ready to cook, heat a pan to very very hot over the highest heat your burner can muster. Some people prefer cast-iron, some prefer a grill pan, I prefer a nonstick skillet. (I don’t believe the pan affects the taste, but there are some who feel adamant that it does.) 4. While the pan is getting super duper hot, rinse the salt off of the steaks and dry them well with paper towels. Season on both sides with a normal amount of salt and pepper. 5. Hold the steak with a pair of tongs above the hot pan. Find the edge of the steak that has a strip of fat on it. Hold the fat-covered edge of the steak in the pan with the tongs until it releases some grease and browns. (I praise the day nearly 10 years ago when I read about this Alain Ducasse trick in the New York Times.) Then, lay the steak on a flat side and cook it for a few minutes, until it browns. Flip it over and cook it on the second side. 6. Don’t cook the steak to the desired temperature–it will continue to cook as it rests, which it must do before serving. For example, if someone likes medium-rare, cook it to rare. How do you know when it’s done? This is the trickiest part and ultimately takes a lot of practice, unless you are one of those folks who puts faith in their meat thermometer. If you’re using a thermometer, the rule of thumb is 140 degrees for rare, 160 for medium, and 170 for well-done. I personally use the finger test, which is well explained here on Simply Recipes. 7. When the meat is almost done (not all the way, since it will keep cooking even after the heat is off), turn off the pan and leave it sitting on the stovetop. If there is not a lot of juice/grease in the pan, add a small knob of butter to the pan and swirl it around. If there is a lot of meat juice in the pan you can skip the butter. 8. Rest the steaks for 5-10 minutes before serving. Eat. Swoon. Savor. Drool.

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